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Metadata Management Tips to Keep Your Data Safe

Metadata Management Tips to Keep Your Data Safe

by Purva Jagtap

If you had ten thousand ten-dollar bills—one million dollars tota—set aside and found out there was a security breach that put that money at risk, you’d do whatever possible to keep that money safe, right? For a business, metadata is the equivalent of that money—and it could very well lead to as much in earnings if applied properly.

There’s no chance of turning metadata into massive income if the data is put in jeopardy, though. With a quality metadata manager and effective data governance, a company can safely maintain their metadata and ensure their organization can implement that information while moving closer to their overarching business goals. 

Choose the best metadata management tools.

Choose the best metadata management tools

The first and most important step in implementing proper metadata security is to select the optimal tool for metadata management. For instance, without the documentation and management offered by tools like TIBCO’s software, a company would struggle to find the appropriate information when they need it, much less keep it secure. 

Comply with regulatory guidelines. 

Comply with regulatory guidelines

A data governance system within an organization will be a helpful tool in optimizing metadata security. However, that same security can be made all the safer by considering guidelines on a global scale. The 2018 implementation of GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) regulates the protection and privacy of user data, including metadata. By complying with these guidelines, a company isn‘t only maintaining regulatory compliance—they’re effectively implementing tighter data (and metadata) security.

Communicate with all stakeholders. 

Communicate with all stakeholders.

Under GDPR, businesses are required to gain customer consent when collecting data. There’s little doubt you’ve seen your share of checkboxes when signing up for an email newsletter or filling out a form on a website. Another vital component of GDPR, though, is the notification of affected parties in case of a data breach.

Should someone bypass a company’s security measures and access private data, such as clients’ emails, names, or other identifying information, that company is required by law to inform those clients in addition to taking efforts to remedy the issue and prevent it from happening again. 

Consider your data fabric as a whole.

Consider your data fabric as a whole

For the unfamiliar, data fabric is defined as “a modern distributed data architecture that includes shared data assets and optimized data fabric pipelines that you can use to address today’s data challenges in a unified way”. Put more simply, the data fabric consists of all the architectures, technologies, and data management tools a business utilizes to organize and maintain its data.

The ins and outs of data management are challenging due to, in large part, a greater input of information than ever seen before. To take advantage of these information assets, a business leader must understand and organize them, knowing where to find them, how to use them, and what must be done to keep them safe.

By studying the data fabric in its entirety, rather than in individual technologies and architectures, an organization will gain a big-picture view of their metadata and the potential risks affecting it. 

Conduct regular audits. 

Conduct regular audits.

An outside company or on-site team can conduct data protection or security audits to ensure that the business’s data is secure. These audits can identify potential risks or flaws in security, consistently maintain the data catalog, and ensure continued compliance with GDPR and other regulations. The most successful businesses, then, schedule these audits regularly, keeping one step ahead of potential security breaches. 

If you had a sudden windfall of cash, you wouldn’t let that money lying around—you’d secure it in a bank vault or perhaps a personal safe. So, too, would a company strive to keep their metadata (and other forms of data) safe and secure. Not only does it protect their business and strengthen their customers’ trust, but it allows the business to make the most of that data, increasing their earnings in the process. 

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